CFP: Making Meaning from Data

Sponsored by the Digital Classics Association
Organizers: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY; Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Jeffrey Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri Kansas-City

Digital techniques hold the promise of providing a consistent and comprehensive basis for the interpretation of classical culture, yet they also raise significant questions of method. Do digital approaches lead us away from certain kinds of interpretation and toward others? How does the quantitative and aggregate nature of argumentation common to digital humanities relate to other modes of understanding the ancient world? Papers are invited for this session that reflect theoretically on the study and understanding of classical antiquity in light of the growing importance of digital methods. Participants may take as their object material any aspect of classical culture, including, but not limited to: history, language, literature, material and visual culture, and philosophy.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to digitalclassicsassociation@gmail.com, with identifying information in the email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously by three readers in accordance with APA regulations. In your email, please confirm that you are an APA member in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines of the instructions for individual abstracts on the APA website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 5 p.m. Eastern Time, February 3, 2014.

Contact: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY, ncoffee@buffalo.edu

Last modified on October 25, 2013